CQC Approval For Thames Valley Vasectomy Services

CQC approval Thames Valley Vasectomy Services

CQC approval of Thames Valley Vasectomy Services

CQC, the “Care Quality Commission” is the regulator for all medical services including Minor Surgery and Vasectomy Services. Thames Valley Vasectomy Services was last visited in December 2013.

Full copy of the CQC approval for TVVS

Click here for evidence of the excellent feedback the CQC gave the service only recently

Find below a few snippets of what the CQC said about TVVS

“…We spoke to seven patients about their respect and dignity when they used the service. All of the people we spoke with reported no concerns and were complimentary in their feedback. The patients we spoke with were satisfied with their procedure outcomes. For example,one patient reported, “The service was so good I wrote in to say thank you and how pleased I was”. Another patient we spoke with told us, “Outstanding” and a third patient stated, “I would recommend (the service)”. There were effective systems in place to reduce the risk and spread of infection. Patients were given information about how to prepare for the surgery and prevent infections prior to attending their appointment. Appropriate checks were undertaken before staff began work. We looked at three employee files. Staff recruitment records we looked at showed proper procedures had been followed. Patients we talked with spoke highly of the service and indicated their opinions were taken on board in the day to day delivery of procedures. Patients we spoke with had only compliments to make about Thames Valley Vasectomy Services…”

“…Care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure patients’ safety and welfare. Reasons for our judgement We spoke with seven patients about the care they experienced when they used Thames Valley Vasectomy Services. The patients we spoke with were satisfied with their procedure outcomes. For example, one patient reported, “The service was so good I wrote in to say thank you and how pleased I was”. Another patient we spoke with told us, “Outstanding” and a third patient stated, “I would recommend (the service)”. Patients’ needs were assessed and care and treatment was planned and delivered in line with their individual care plan. Patients had the option of different routes for the vasectomy depending on their personal requirements. The registered manager told us patients could choose to have a consultation only and then take time to make a final decision about the surgery. The registered manager explained there was also a “fast-track” approach which meant patients could have the consultation and surgery all in one go. A small number of patients decided they did not wish to proceed with the procedure and their decision was respected by the provider. We saw the doctor asked the patient and their partners about contraception choice, lifestyles and plans for children or changes in relationship. The provider only offered the surgery where the patient met pre-defined criteria for progressing to the operation. Care and treatment was planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure patients’ safety and welfare. We pathway tracked a patient who chose the “fast- track”option on the day of our inspection. We saw the doctor first spoke with the patient and their partner in a consultation room. The doctors checked the patient’s medical and surgical history, asked about medications and allergies. The doctor then performed a physical examination to ensure there were no contraindications (reasons not to have) the surgery. We saw the nurse then escorted the patient to the changing room where the patient was prepared for the procedure. The surgical intervention was carried out using local anaesthetic in a procedure room under sterile conditions. The patient was then helped back to the changing room, where they were given their post-operative instructions. Extensive information was provided to patients by the doctor and nurse following their surgery about self-care. We saw this included education about pain relief, how to prevent swelling and bleeding, how to undertake personal hygiene and how to keep the surgical site clean. Patients were also informed about contraception precautions until they received clearance from the doctor about their sterility. The nurse provided reassurance and guidance to patients about sexual activity and how to provide a semen sample 16 weeks following the procedure. Patients were also provided information about what would happen if their semen sample did not confirm sterility at that stage and possible options for ensuring the success of the procedure. Patients’ care and treatment reflected relevant research and guidance. We found the service’s procedures and information provided by staff were based on recent clinical research. For example, we saw the doctor was able to explain statistics to patients about potential outcomes of their vasectomy, possible complications and the success rate. We heard the doctor explain the percentages for each subjects to patients and quote where the information was obtained. We found the doctor was knowledgeable about the procedure and experienced in the performance of the surgery. The provider’s website further supported that the service offered to patients was based on current literature. For example, we saw that the website discussed the guidelines set by the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and how the service’s practice was in line with them. There were arrangements in place to deal with foreseeable emergencies. The doctor, nurse and registered manager were trained in basic life support and records we viewed verified this. The service had a “grab bag” on site at the location which contained essential emergency equipment and medications to use in the event of a cardiac arrest or other life-threatening event. The registered manager told us the service was able to use the location’s defibrillator if necessary and staff were trained in its operation. Patients were also given information to take home on what to do if there was excessive swelling or bleeding and direct after hours contact numbers for the service. Patients could also attend their local GP or accident and emergency department if necessary…”